Archive for the ‘Food Poisoning’ Category

Shigella Food Poisoning Outbreak Closes San Jose Restaurant


(Photo credits:; KGO ABC 7 News.)

The Santa Clara County Health Department has closed Mariscos San Juan, a San Jose, California seafood restaurant due to a Shigella food poisoning outbreak that has sickened more than 90 people.

What is Shigella?

Shigellosis is an infection caused by Shigella bacteria.  Symptoms usually appear within 1-2 days after infection.

How Bad Is It?

Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common symptomsChildren and immuno-compromised people are most at risk of infection.

Shigella complications are rare, but they can be serious.  They include Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome (HUS) that can cause acute kidney failure and reactive arthritis.  

How Does It Spread?

Although no specific source of contamination has been identified in this outbreak, there are multiple possible sources of shigella infection, which is highly contagious.  These include:

How is It Treated?

Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which can be treated with fluids.  Serious cases may require additional medical treatment such as antibiotics.

Why Should I Worry About It?

Shigella is prevalent, causing about 500,000 cases annually in the U.S.

Shigella bacteria are also developing resistance to many common antibiotics, which makes the condition harder to treat and more likely to spread.

What Can I Do About It?

Shigella victim Greg Meissner filed a lawsuit against the restaurant.  Given the number of people infected, more will likely follow.

“Natural” Food and Artificial Injustice – Toward a Fair Liability Standard

Please see my recently-published article in Plaintiff Magazine regarding the liability standards that apply in California for food-related personal injuries.

The Mexicali Rose decision allows plaintiffs to state some previously non-cognizable negligence claims against restaurants that serve injury-causing food.  Mexicali Rose v. Sup. Ct. (Clark), 1 Cal.4th 617, 621 (1992) (“Mexicali Rose”).  However, if the injury resulted from a substance that was “natural to the preparation of the food,” then strict liability and breach of warranty claims remain barred.  Id. at 630.

In light of food processing and safety changes that have occurred since this 1992 decision, the artificial, vague, and unworkable distinction between foreign and purportedly natural substances should be overruled.  A fair measure of justice should be available for all consumers, based on their reasonable expectations for the food served.

“Good Things Come From Sysco” (Allegedly Via Unrefrigerated Storage Lockers)

NBC Bay Area has reported that foodservice giant Sysco allegedly kept perishable foods in unrefrigerated storage lockers for several hours before delivering them to customers.

If these allegations are true, they raise multiple issues regarding food safety and quality.  Most laypersons know that perishable food like milk and meat must be stored at proper cold temperatures to maximize food safety and minimize the growth of many dangerous pathogens.  The USDA recommends discarding many perishable foods that have been held above 40 degrees F for more than two hours.  Sysco clearly understands these concerns, as it (1) presents ServSafe “state-of-the-art food safety training” and (2) tells investors all about the high technology used in its climate-controlled warehouses.

Refrigeration is also critical to maintain food freshness throughout its recommended shelf life.  Perishable foods that have been subjected to temperature abuse rapidly degrade in quality, so buyers may not be getting all of the freshness they paid for.

This also raises an issue of unnecessary food waste.  Even utilizing modern temperature controls, each year, Americans throw away almost half of their food, worth an estimated $165 billion.  This means more than just people going hungry; it wastes massive amounts of water, land productivity, and energy.  Sysco represents that it takes its sustainability responsibility “seriously.”

So how can buyers protect themselves from temperature-abused food that might look just fine when it is delivered?  Technologies like RFID provide data to verify proper holding temperatures throughout the supply chain, but they are not used as widely as they could be.

If the allegations are proven, “Sysco faces misdemeanor criminal charges and a one thousand dollar fine for each violation,” not including possible customer lawsuits.

Food Fraud: More Than Just Economic Injury

Do you really know what kind of fish you’re eating?” And why that’s such an important question?

As recently reported in Food Safety News, food fraud (by way of species substitution) presents more than a risk of ripping off consumers.  Pregnant women may be unwittingly exposed to toxins, gastric distress, and allergens from consuming seafood that is not what it purports to be.  Honest employees of fishing companies, distributors, and retailers that sell genuine products can lose sales and their jobs.

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) recently asked the FDA to increase its efforts to reduce seafood mislabeling.  For bad actors, increased “traceability and enforcement . . . from bait to plate” presents risks of criminal prosecution and civil damages from class action litigation.  However, for seafood companies that adopt best practices, it also provides promotional and marketing opportunities.

Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) Fraud: A Worldwide Problem

Today’s edition of reports that numerous Chinese infant formula manufacturers are allegedly falsely claiming that their products were manufactured in New Zealand.  At least one company, Abid, allegedly falsely claimed a product endorsement from Prime Minister John Key.

Why is this Happening?

Chinese consumers are willing to pay a premium price for NZ baby formula due to its perceived safety and quality advantages over Chinese-made products.  Chinese consumer confidence in the safety of domestically-produced food has declined over the last year, and dairy products are the number one imported food in the country.  In just June and July 2012, Chinese firms recalled infant formula and milk products contaminated with mercury, aflatoxin, and lye.  These recent problems demonstrate that the country still needs to improve its food safety and quality after the 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula disaster that implicated 22 companies.

Why should my Company Care about COOL Fraud?

Companies should consider proactively addressing country-of-origin labeling (COOL) fraud to reduce the risk of brand dilution, lost sales, and injuries to their customers.  New Zealand has a top-three country brand name.  Some of its manufacturers are specifically marketing their products as being “safe” or “tamper proof,” based on the country’s strong food safety and environmental standards.  Higher Western food safety standards present an opportunity to boost sales to Chinese consumers.  COOL fraud also may present risks of civil and criminal liability as well as conviction in the court of public opinion.

Can Newly-Discovered Additive Reduce Food-Borne Illness?

Cargill recently initiated a Class I recall of almost 36 million pounds of ground turkey due to potential contamination from a multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella Heidelberg that allegedly caused 76 illnesses and one death.  Consumer concern about antibiotic-resistant bacteria in meat was increasing even before this outbreak.

A recently-discovered additive may reduce the prevalence and risk of this contamination.  Scientists at the University of Minnesota have recently discovered a naturally-occurring lantibiotic that attacks E. coli, salmonella, and listeria.  It is reportedly “easily digestible, non-toxic, non-allergenic” and “difficult for bacteria to develop resistance against.”  They expect to commercialize the additive within the next three years.

Food Poisoning: A Recurring Problem that Requires Investing in Prevention

June 7, 2011 Comments off

Recent news stories illustrate that bacterial food poisoning is a recurring, high cost, sickening (and in some cases, deadly) problem that requires investing in prevention.

Today’s Washington Post includes an online article about how salmonella infections have increased “by 10 percent in recent years.”   (The longitudinal data regarding the total number of U.S. cases from 1996 to 2009 can be found here.)

Additionally, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the 2009 salmonella incidence rate was 15.19 cases per 100,000 population, which is more than twice the National Health Objective of 6.8 cases per 100,000.

Elizabeth Hagen, the Undersecretary for Food Safety at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, noted that the incidence of E. coli O157:H7 infections has decreased, demonstrating that more stringent regulation and efforts by meat processing companies in particular have lowered contamination at the slaughterhouse level.  However, as the recent outbreak in Germany of the world’s deadliest E. coli tragically illustrates, “new and ‘highly infectious and toxic‘” E. coli strains are emerging from a source(s) that is still unknown.

Compounding the human tragedy, some businesses that sell fresh produce have seen their sales fall 35 percent since the outbreak began.  EU farmers’ losses are estimated at $611 million per week.  Former FDA Commissioner David Acheson has opined that an outbreak like the current one could happen in the U.S.

Michael R. Taylor, the FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods, provided sound advice for the food industry: “investing in prevention is, ultimately, the only way to provide the protection that consumers expect.”


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