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Posts Tagged ‘17500’

“Good Things Come From Sysco” (Allegedly Via Unrefrigerated Storage Lockers)

NBC Bay Area has reported that foodservice giant Sysco allegedly kept perishable foods in unrefrigerated storage lockers for several hours before delivering them to customers.

If these allegations are true, they raise multiple issues regarding food safety and quality.  Most laypersons know that perishable food like milk and meat must be stored at proper cold temperatures to maximize food safety and minimize the growth of many dangerous pathogens.  The USDA recommends discarding many perishable foods that have been held above 40 degrees F for more than two hours.  Sysco clearly understands these concerns, as it (1) presents ServSafe “state-of-the-art food safety training” and (2) tells investors all about the high technology used in its climate-controlled warehouses.

Refrigeration is also critical to maintain food freshness throughout its recommended shelf life.  Perishable foods that have been subjected to temperature abuse rapidly degrade in quality, so buyers may not be getting all of the freshness they paid for.

This also raises an issue of unnecessary food waste.  Even utilizing modern temperature controls, each year, Americans throw away almost half of their food, worth an estimated $165 billion.  This means more than just people going hungry; it wastes massive amounts of water, land productivity, and energy.  Sysco represents that it takes its sustainability responsibility “seriously.”

So how can buyers protect themselves from temperature-abused food that might look just fine when it is delivered?  Technologies like RFID provide data to verify proper holding temperatures throughout the supply chain, but they are not used as widely as they could be.

If the allegations are proven, “Sysco faces misdemeanor criminal charges and a one thousand dollar fine for each violation,” not including possible customer lawsuits.

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Food Fraud: More Than Just Economic Injury

Do you really know what kind of fish you’re eating?” And why that’s such an important question?

As recently reported in Food Safety News, food fraud (by way of species substitution) presents more than a risk of ripping off consumers.  Pregnant women may be unwittingly exposed to toxins, gastric distress, and allergens from consuming seafood that is not what it purports to be.  Honest employees of fishing companies, distributors, and retailers that sell genuine products can lose sales and their jobs.

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) recently asked the FDA to increase its efforts to reduce seafood mislabeling.  For bad actors, increased “traceability and enforcement . . . from bait to plate” presents risks of criminal prosecution and civil damages from class action litigation.  However, for seafood companies that adopt best practices, it also provides promotional and marketing opportunities.