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Posts Tagged ‘LFTB’

Pink Slime Ate My Press Conference

Bruce Smith has postponed indefinitely a press conference to announce his book, How Pink Slime Ate My Job, and his lawsuit apparently arising out of the LFTB/pink slime controversy.

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BPI Former Employee: “Pink Slime Ate My Job.” Or was It BPI’s Decision Not to Disclose LFTB on Labels?

Former Beef Products, Inc. (BPI) employee Bruce Smith has filed a lawsuit concurrently with publishing his new book, “How Pink Slime Ate My Job.”  (Apparently, Mr. Smith alleges that media publicity concerning the widespread, unlabeled addition of Lean, Finely Textured Beef (LFTB) to ground beef decreased BPI’s sales and resulted in company layoffs.)  Free copies of Smith’s book and his lawsuit will be available at his June 26, 2012 press conference.

Iowa Rep. Steve King has stated he supports Mr. Smith’s use of the court system to “get to the bottom of this” alleged controversy, but why?  And why has he stated that the federal government should order public schools to buy LFTB for their discounted lunch programs?  (Only three states have chosen to purchase LFTB next year due to public demand to curtail its use.)

Do these have anything to do with the fact that BPI is one Rep. King’s top 20 campaign contributors?  For other social issues, Congressman King has raised a concern that the nation’s “runaway judiciary” plays an “active role in the lives of our children.”  Rep. King also contends he is “a firm believer in states’ rights” and the need to “protect parental rights from being infringed by the federal government.”   Why is the LFTB/pink slime controversy any different?

Another unanswered question for Mr. Smith and Rep. King: if LFTB is so great, why did BPI make a concerted effort to avoid labeling it instead of just disclosing it on product packaging?  The free market Rep. King supports requires freely-available information so consumers can make intelligent buying decisions.  Two LFTB producers have submitted labeling requests to the USDA, because some consumers who have learned more about the product want to buy it.  Good for them.  As Marion Nestle (quoting Carolyn Scott-Thomas) noted, if companies selling this product had proactively disclosed its presence in the first instance, they might have minimized customer outrage (and BPI job losses) from its recent publicity.